Donal Wylde’s new book “The Times and The Joys” is a gift to the people

Debbie Swift and Nuala Strappe spot themselves in the book
The Times and the Joys, Donal Wylde’s new book of old photos, was a great gift to the people of Clonmel and Tipperary, the gathering at the book’s launch was told.

The Times and the Joys, Donal Wylde’s new book of old photos, was a great gift to the people of Clonmel and Tipperary, the gathering at the book’s launch was told.

The book by the former Nationalist photographer and RTE cameraman is a follow-up to his 2011 production The Light of Other Days, and again delves into his treasure trove of black and white photos from the 1960s and 70s.

When the book and an accompanying exhibition were launched at the County Museum in Clonmel Tom Acheson, the County Council vice-chairman, said that Clonmel and South Tipperary were fortunate that Donal Wylde, originally from Ennis, had settled in this area.

He was a craftsman who captured people and almost held them in time, and for future generations, and his book was a great gift to the people of the area. The Times and The Joys would not only evoke great memories but also fun and even sadness.

He said we could all identify with different photos, such as one from Sandybanks where Cllr. Acheson and thousands of others had learned to swim. He predicted that days and weeks would be spent going through the book and poring over its pages.

Fellow Clare man and RTE sports broadcaster Marty Morrissey, the special guest at the launch, said he was sent out with a cameraman called Donal Wylde on one of his first gigs with RTE. They immediately clicked and had been the best of friends since. Donal Wylde was one of his mentors and an exceptional photographer and brilliant cameraman.

Donal Wylde revealed that former Nationalist photographer and RTE producer Justin Nelson had been the original driving force behind the project and he was delighted he was present at the launch.

He also had words of praise for his wife Jean and family, for their patience; and Museum curator Marie McMahon, whom he said the town was lucky to have.

We now lived in a constantly changing world of communications but this book was from an age of no parking restrictions or traffic lights and without a smartphone, Playstation or tweet in sight, he added.