Time to shout stop as Tipp lags behind on jobs front

The news that South Tipperary is way down the list when it comes to securing IDA jobs is hardly a surprise to anybody. A breakdown of jobs created last year by foreign direct investment by the Industrial Development Authority reveals how few jobs were created in South Tipperary.

The news that South Tipperary is way down the list when it comes to securing IDA jobs is hardly a surprise to anybody. A breakdown of jobs created last year by foreign direct investment by the Industrial Development Authority reveals how few jobs were created in South Tipperary.

South Tipperary, with just ten jobs created, was fifth from the bottom of the list but it fared much better than North Tipperary which saw no job created through foreign direct investment.

It was a year in which the IDA recorded its strongest net job performance in a decade with 11,766 jobs created in client companies.

That South Tipperary saw just ten of those jobs is a shocking return for this part of the country, an area that has suffered massive jobs losses in the last few years.

One would expect at least a few crumbs from the table when it comes to job creation but South Tipperary fared woefully as did North Tipperary.

Where is the outcry that should have accompanied this information? The table was revealed last Thursday and elected representatives attached to both government and opposition parties have been very quiet on the issue.

Only Monaghan (3 jobs), Laois (2) and Leitrim (1) fared worse than South Tipperary, and North Tipperary was the only area where not one job was created.

Sixth from the bottom was Offaly but even though only one place separated Offaly and South Tipperary, there was a big difference in the number of jobs created with Offaly (31) receiving just over three times as many jobs as South Tipperary in a twelve month period.

Dublin grabbed over half of the jobs created at 6,389 which came to 54% of the total provided.

Second placed Cork was a long way off with 1,979 jobs.

The figures were provided by Richard Bruuton , Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation in a written response to Fine Gael’s Deputy Joe McHugh.

For years the various town councils that operate in South Tipperary have patiently sent letters to IDA officials and invited them to their meetings in the hope that they could explain what exactly was being done to attract jobs to the area.

It has been the view of the members of those town councils that South Tipperary and in particular the urban areas they represent have been getting a raw deal and the figures released back up that argument.

Whatever case was made to attract new jobs to South Tipperary the outcome has been very disappointing.

Pressure has to be maintained on Fine Gael and Labour Oireachtas members to see to it that South Tipperary moves up that table.