Lidl seeks planning for extension to its new Carrick-on-Suir store

Discount supermarket chain, Lidl, has sought planning permission to extend the size of the discount supermarket it is developing on the site of the former Schiesser factory on the Clonmel Road in Carrick-on-Suir.

Discount supermarket chain, Lidl, has sought planning permission to extend the size of the discount supermarket it is developing on the site of the former Schiesser factory on the Clonmel Road in Carrick-on-Suir.

Carrick-on-Suir Town Council is due to reach a decision on Lidl Ireland Gmbh’s planning application for the flat roofed extension to the supermarket on May 15.

Work has begun on preparing the former Schiesser factory site. Planning permission has already been obtained to demolish the facotry and construct a 1661sqm single storey discount store with 114 car parking spaces on the site.

The planning application requesting permission to extend the size of the Lidl supermarket also seeks permission to develop an “enclosed plant area” adjoining the extension and to change the layout of the car park.

Permission is also being sought by Lidl Ireland to erect three externally illuminated billboard signs.

The closing date for public submissions on the planning application to be lodged with Carrick-on-Suir Town Council was Tuesday.

Lidl Ireland refused to release details on when it plans to open its Carrick-on-Suir store and how many jobs it will create.

The German retail giant has had a long fight to open a store in the town in opposition to the town’s Aldi outlet on the Pill Road.

Several years ago, the Town Council refused planning permission to Lidl to build a store on a site adjacent to the Aldi supermarket. The planner considered having two such stores in the same area of the town’s outskirts would be detrimental to the stores in the town centre.

RGDATA, the body representing independent retailers, objected to the application by businessman James Coleman to redevelop the Schiesser factory site into a discount foodstore and appealed the permission granted to the project to An Bord Pleanala last July.

Last November, the planning appeals board decided by a five/two majority not to accept its inspector’s recommendation to refuse permission and upheld the Town Council’s grant of permission subject to 11 conditions.

The board concluded that taking into account the nature and scale of the development, “brownfield nature” of the site and the commercial zoning and location of the site within the town, the discount store would not have a detrimental impact on the vitality and viability of the town centre once the developer complied with the planning conditions.