Aiseiri seeks funding for its treatment centre in Tipperary and elsewhere in the south east

Boxer Kenneth Egan speaks at launch of annual report

Aiseiri seeks funding for its treatment centre in Tipperary and elsewhere in the south east

Aiseiri has called on the Government for urgent funds to meet the increased demand for addiction services in the South East at the launch of its 2015 Annual Report.

Irish Olympian, Kenneth Egan, launched the Annual Report, which highlights an increase in the number of clients availing of its services last year in four facilities in the South East, including Cahir in County Tipperary.

Chief executive Paul Conlon, (pictured) said that, while Aiséirí’s financial position improved in 2015, the increased demand for services in the South East has put pressure on its facilities in Waterford, Wexford, Tipperary and Kilkenny.

“The funding model for our adolescent detoxification and rehabilitation service is not suitable. So we are calling on the Government to fund this essential and successful programme into the future.

“ This will provide a tangible return on the investment for the Exchequer, as young people will be able to take control of their addiction and return to their families and communities,” he said.

Mr Conlon explained that, despite being the only residential detoxification and treatment service for adolescents in the country, Aiséirí struggles to raise funds from private sources to try and cover its cost base and this is not sustainable into the future.

The Annual Report was launched by the Olympic Silver Medallist, Kenneth Egan, who has battled with his own addictions.

“I started drinking at the age of 13 or 14 and fully appreciate why services like those at Aiséirí are absolutely crucial to people at a young age. They can literally change young people’s futures as well as helping families come through the ordeal,” he said.

In 2015, Aiséirí had 175 admissions in its adolescent detoxification and rehabilitation service in Kilkenny, an increase of 60 individuals on the previous year.

347 adults were admitted to its adult services in Wexford and Tipperary, an increase of 27 individuals on the previous year, with a further 33 provided with long term secondary treatment in the residential services in Waterford.

Aiséirí saw a rise in the number of women presenting for treatment, many with complex needs. There are urgent requirements for secondary treatment facilities, housing support and specific services to meet these needs.

“We would like to provide such services in the South East, which has no such facilities at present. We have the infrastructure in place in Waterford to deliver on this and, with a little extra funding, the second stage treatment facility for women could well be a reality in 2017,” Mr Conlon said.