All-Ireland goalkeeper’s hurley ‘saved’ after 42 years

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Former Tipperary goalkeeper Peter O’Sullivan was reunited with the hurley he used in the 1971 All Ireland Final by County Chairman Sean Nugent at the Sean Ghael Awards. Peter last saw the camán on the great day in ‘71 when he was asked by the late Cahir hurley maker John Joe O’Brien if he could borrow the hurley to use as a template. It was finally returned on Sunday after 42 years by John Joe’s son Ger, a third generation hurley maker.

Former Tipperary goalkeeper Peter O’Sullivan was reunited with the hurley he used in the 1971 All Ireland Final by County Chairman Sean Nugent at the Sean Ghael Awards. Peter last saw the camán on the great day in ‘71 when he was asked by the late Cahir hurley maker John Joe O’Brien if he could borrow the hurley to use as a template. It was finally returned on Sunday after 42 years by John Joe’s son Ger, a third generation hurley maker.

Former Tipperary goalkeeper Peter O’Sullivan was reunited with the hurley he used in the 1971 All Ireland Final by County Chairman Sean Nugent at the Sean Ghael Awards. Peter last saw the camán on the great day in ‘71 when he was asked by the late Cahir hurley maker John Joe O’Brien if he could borrow the hurley to use as a template. It was finally returned on Sunday after 42 years by John Joe’s son Ger, a third generation hurley maker.

Sean Gael Award For Peter O’Sullivan

Sean Gael awards recognise the contribution of an individual within club and county to Gaelic games over their lifetime. Among the 32 recipients honoured by the Tipperary County Board this year is our own Peter O’Sullivan. Peter, who had been understudy to John O’Donoghue for a number of years, took over as goalkeeper and went on to win an All-Ireland in 1971. He gave a fine display on the occasion and won Sports Star of the Week for his performance. His hurling career came to a premature end in 1972 when he was badly injured in a work accident.

He progressed to minor level, winning three West-hurling titles in 1959, 1960 and 1961. In the last year he was also on the Tipperary minor team that won the Munster final but lost to Kilkenny in the All-Ireland final. He moved up to U21 level in his final year as minor and won the first of three West medals. The other two were in 1963 and 1964, when the competition progressed to the county for the first time and Roscrea beat Cashel in the final. In the same year Peter was on the county team that won the first U21 All-Ireland.

In 1963 Peter won a junior hurling All-Ireland when Tipperary defeated London in the final at Thurles. Also on that team were Babs Keating, Mick Roche and Jim Fogarty.

Peter’s displays in goal at minor, junior and U21 led to him being drafted in as sub-goalkeeper for the senior team. He won All-Ireland medals in 1964 and 1965 as well as National League medals in the same years. As a result of the 1965 Home Final victory he travelled with the team to the U.S. to play New York in the final proper. As well as winning two league medals Peter played in two losing finals, 1966 and 1971. The Oireachtas was still a major tournament during the 60s and into the 70s. Peter won five of these during his career, in 1963, 1964, 1965, 1970 and 1972. He played Railway Cup with Munster in 1972.

Parallel with Peter’s successes at the intercounty level were his achievements with Cashel King Cormac’s. He has five West senior hurling medals to his credit, won in 1965, 1971, 1975, 1976 and 1980.

Among his other achievements was to hold the position of county junior hurling selector in 1985 when Tipperary won the Munster final but went down to Wexford in the All-Ireland final.

Peter was also a referee for about 15 years. The Cashel King Cormac’s would like to congratulate Peter, his wife and family, on his richly deserved award.