European gathering in Cashel fast approaching

Since 1989 small communities, one from each of the countries of the European Union, have a bond of friendship which is registered in the Charter of European Rural Communities.

Since 1989 small communities, one from each of the countries of the European Union, have a bond of friendship which is registered in the Charter of European Rural Communities.

From every member state of the European Union there is one rural community represented in the Charter. Every year the annula meeting is held in a different member country and this year it’s Cashel’s turn to host the delegations, delegates and mayors. Each delegation comprises of a maximum of 10 delegates, including at least four young people. The meeting is based on a current theme and this years theme is “the effects of demographic development on the rural economy”.

The events programme is ready, accommodation is in place and the theme selected. “Cashel has to grasp this unique opportunity and rise to the occasion”, says Mayor Maribel Wood.

At a recent Cashel Town COuncil meeting the mayor proposed the motion: “That we the Council congratulate all those involved in the success of Queen Elizabeth’s visit, both nationally and locally”.

The mayor congratulated everyone involved in the security aspect of the visit both at national level and local level.

In relation to Cashel she said that great credit was due to the officials and staff of both the Town and County Councils, the Tidy Towns committee, town gardeners and many business people and citizens of the town.

She said that a small minority failed to rise to the occasion but hoped they would put their act together before the Charter Meeting. She said that the notice served by the Council on some property owners under the derelict sites act had positive results and made a huge difference, especially in areas like the Back of the Pipe. She hoped that the standards set could be maintained and even improved upon.

Rock Lane.

The Mayor stated that the Rock Lane was the last remaining section of the old Cashel highway and some years ago there was a plan to pave the area and make it more presentable and safe. She thought that traffic should be restricted to that of residents, delivery vehicles and for access to Bru Boru.

In her opinion ramps were not the solution as the lane was very steep, had no footpaths and was very narrow. Ramps were also difficult for wheelchair users and people with disabilities.

Her primary concern was for the safety of residents and users and she was pleased that management of the Council were now prepared to sit down with all interested parties, including elected members, and come up with a practical and workable solution.