No pylons in South Tipp, Eirgrid told

Three to five monstrous 
pylons every kilometre would run through the heart of South Tipperary if one of the options for the EirGrid line is given the all clear.

Three to five monstrous 
pylons every kilometre would run through the heart of South Tipperary if one of the options for the EirGrid line is given the all clear.

Members of Clonmel Borough Council voiced their opposition to the Grid Link project which is seeking to locate 45m high pylons on one of three route corridor options running through South Tipperary and West Waterford.

EirGrid representatives told the members that the project was about ‘keeping the lights on’ but members voiced their opposition to the plan.

Cllr. Billy Shoer accused the EirGrid representatives of causing widespread panic in communities for no 
reason.

Cllr. Shoer said it was clear that the county Waterford route was the shortest and most economical and he asked why were communities living on the two other corridors being put through 
such fear.

Cllr. Darren Ryan asked why should the beautiful landscape of South Tipperary be destroyed forever. He maintained that the new grid would be of no economic benefit to South Tipperary at all.

Cllr. Brian O’Donnell asked how many pylons would be located in South 
Tipperary if that route emerged as the chosen one. He said the scenic beauty of the area would be destroyed if the Carrick/Clonmel/Cahir route 
was selected.

Cllr. Joe Leahy said it was estimated that there would be two hundred pylons between Carrick and Skeheenarinky if that route 
was selected.

Cllr. Siobhan Ambrose said the other route, the one going through Waterford, was the shorter one and one that would be more efficient 
wto provide.

Mayor Pat English said that the grid would be of no benefit to South Tipperary and if the route through Clonmel was selected it would do huge damage to tourism in the area.

EirGrid’s John Lowry said that while the Waterford route was the more direct they had to look at a number of different route corridors as part of the process..

“These pylons are no different to what is out there already. This is nothing new in Ireland. People should be allowed participate in the process, we are not trying to panic them,” Mr Lowry said.