Fears expressed for future of x-ray service at Cashel hospital

Fears have been expressed that the temporary removal of x-ray examinations from Our Lady’s Hospital in Cashel could become permanent.

Fears have been expressed that the temporary removal of x-ray examinations from Our Lady’s Hospital in Cashel could become permanent.

The x-rays taken two days a week in Cashel were a tremendous service for the people of the town and surrounding areas, Cllr. Sean McCarthy stated at the monthly meeting of the local Town Council.

They were also beneficial for the patients and doctors alike.

Cllr. McCarthy was concerned that measures that were introduced on a temporary basis often became permanent. They were told it had happened because three radiographers were off duty for one month and there was a shortage of staff.

Up to €5 million had been spent renovating the hospital and in his view “it would be a terror to see something else going”.

A radiology service was provided to between 350 and 400 patients each month at Our Lady’s. It had been agreed that there would be a minor surgical unit in Cashel and in order for this to run effectively x-rays were performed twice a week.

Cllr. McCarthy said he would have made the same argument even if his own Fianna Fail party were in power.

It was time to nip this in the bud to ensure it didn’t become permanent, said Cllr. Dan Dillon, while Cllr. Joe Moloney also supported.

Cllr. McCarthy also stated that warfarin testing should be reintroduced at Our Lady’s. The laboratory analyst who performed these tests didn’t after all take early retirement, as was the reason given for ending this testing at the hospital, he said.

Blood would continue to be taken in Cashel and sent to Clonmel for testing.

It was very important that the Council fully supported the hospital, said Cllr. PJ Quinlan. The building looked wonderful but there wasn’t enough activity there.

Cllr. Martin Browne (Independent) said that when an attempt was made to close the hospital some years ago many people had worked hard to keep it open. They now owed it to those people to hold onto the services that had been agreed.