Call to ban street hurling in Carrick-on-Suir

The statue of GAA co-founder Maurice Davin which was erected in Carrick-on-Suir earlier this year.
A proposal to ban the playing of hurling on the streets of Carrick, the birthplace of GAA co-founder Maurice Davin, is being investigated.

A proposal to ban the playing of hurling on the streets of Carrick, the birthplace of GAA co-founder Maurice Davin, is being investigated.

FF Cllr Sylvia Cooney-Sheehan’s proposal to introduce by-laws to impose this ban, with exemptions for sports events, is to be discussed at Carrick-on-Suir Joint Policing Committee meeting this evening (Wednesday).

Such a ban would be controversial as hurling is the most popular sport in Carrick, which has three GAA clubs.

Cllr Cooney Sheehan tabled the proposal as a motion at Carrick Town Council’s meeting last week arising from a recent public meeting on anti-social behaviour in the town attended by an estimated 150 people.

The committee formed at that public meeting resolved to campaign for by-laws to restrict the playing of hurling in public streets.

Town Clerk Michael O’Brien said he wasn’t sure the Council had the authority to introduce such by-laws and he would have to research the matter. “I don’t want to be the Cork man banning hurling in Tipperary,” he added.

Cllr Cooney Sheehan highlighted an incident where three people played hurling on the Main Street at 3am one night. “They wanted to practice for next year’s event where they puck the bail up the Main Street,” she explained referring to the urban poc fada contest at the Clancy Brothers Festival in June. Town Engineer Eoin Powell said he reported youths three or four times for playing hurling on town centre streets during the day. “They are creating a serious potential to be knocked down,” he said. Mr O’Brien said the issue would be discussed at the Joint Policing Committee. “We will have to look at whether it’s enforceable or desirable. It’s something we have to be very careful about.”