History of Cormac’s Cemetery

As Cashel Town Council plans an extension to Cormacs Cemetery, Tom Wood has uncovered some interesting material from the town’s past.

As Cashel Town Council plans an extension to Cormacs Cemetery, Tom Wood has uncovered some interesting material from the town’s past.

In 1947 the Urban District Council set about acquiring a suitable piece of land on the outskirts of the town for a burial ground. In February of that year, Mr. Joseph Connolly, Foreman for the Council, presented his findings to the Town Clerk, Mr. John Maher.

In accordance with instructions, Mr. Connolly got authority from Miss Mary Hackett, owner of a field, now Cormacs Cemetery, to excavate trial holes. The field contained three acres, one rood and twenty perches.

The Foreman’s report states: “I had holes dug at four points where I considered a fair indication of the general subsoil of the field would be obtained. The top soil averaged one foot, six inches deep, after which a good clay soil was met with to a depth of six feet. At approximately six feet a loamy gravel was met with to a depth of nine feet. At nine feet I stopped excavation work. Two of the four holes were perfectly dry at nine feet and two showed evidence of water at six feet.”

Mr Connolly said that in view of the extraordinary rainfall he considered the test was satisfactory. Only a few days previously all the adjoining fields were flooded.

In the event of the Council deciding to purchase Miss Hacketts field he recommended that the apex of the triangular field dividing the Clonmel and Fethard roads be taken off if possible, thus giving a wide approach to the graveyard entrance and allowing ample space for ordinary traffic on the occasion of a large funeral.

“This matter,” he concluded, “as well as the necessity for local drainage in this particular area is a matter which might be of interest to the County Council”.