Tipp hospital bravely continues the long fight against sepsis

Present at the Surviving Sepsis Day in South Tipperary General Hospital in Clonmel were Eileen Lynch, SNM; Dr. Majeed, Clinical Director; Michelle Doyle, Infection Control Nurse; Oonagh Keating, Asst. Director of Nursing; Mairead Vaughan, CNM Emergency; Marie Laste, Practice Development; Regina Bennett, ICU; Viva Phelan, Dietician; Dr Marcella Lanzinger; Teresa Deery, Siobhan Flanagan, Infection Control; and Richard Dooley, Hospital Manager, HSE South.
South Tipperary General Hospital in Clonmel hosted a series of events on World Sepsis Day earlier this month to highlight the hospital’s Surviving Sepsis Campaign and the hospital’s commitment to fighting sepsis.

South Tipperary General Hospital in Clonmel hosted a series of events on World Sepsis Day earlier this month to highlight the hospital’s Surviving Sepsis Campaign and the hospital’s commitment to fighting sepsis.

Sepsis happens when an infection overwhelms the body’s natural defences and spreads throughout all organ systems.

Two and a half years ago South Tipp General established a hospital-wide Sepsis Survival Chain and became a member of the international Surviving Sepsis Campaign. This quality improvement initiative supports staff in providing treatment according to best current 
international standard of care for adult septic patients anywhere in the hospital.

Through targeted initiatives, the global Surviving Sepsis Campaign follows a multi-point strategy from start to finish of building awareness, improving diagnosis, increasing the use of appropriate treatment, educating healthcare professionals and improving care for sepsis survivors.

The hospital has trained nursing staff and doctors in the best management of sepsis. The Sepsis Chain is designed for all wards, the emergency department and maternity. Even though international research has shown that very few hospitals worldwide manage to apply the complete set of 
guidelines, South Tipperary General is committed to striving for this goal.

On World Sepsis Day the newly updated international sepsis guidelines were introduced in a dedicated lecture for healthcare professionals. It is a tribute to the success of the campaign in raising sepsis awareness at the hospital that a broad audience of medical students, nursing students, nurses, junior doctors, consultants, physiotherapists, nutritionists and intensive care staff attended.

A big part of the fight against sepsis is infection prevention. The Infection Control Team set up a hand-washing training station in the foyer where visitors could check their technique.

Posters explaining sepsis and the Sepsis Campaign were displayed in the foyer and staff were at hand to explain and answer any questions.

The hospital has reaffirmed its commitment to improving recognition and excellent care of septic patients. A website link is being produced to provide more information on 
sepsis and the local campaign events at www.stgh.org/survivingsepsis